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The Last Song

by Nicholas Sparks

     

Veronica "Ronnie" Miller was not happy. Her parents were divorced, and she hadnít seen or talked to her father in three years. So, why did she have to go spend the summer with him? After all, he was the one who left Ronnie, her mother, and brother, not the other way around. She tried to talk her mother out of this, but Kim Miller would not listen. After all, Ronnieís little brother, Jonah, was very enthusiastic about seeing his dad again.

It was an angry Ronnie who arrived in Wrightsville Beach, South Carolina. For several days she didnít even speak to her father and she stayed away from the house. She took up with a friend named Galadriel, who called herself Blaze. But Blazeís boyfriend, Marcus, was interested in Ronnie.

Ronnie was interested in Will, a beach volleyball player. Will and Ronnie fell in love and enjoyed spending the summer together. Jonah and his father spent this summer working on a stained glass window for the church down the beach that had burned eight months before. It was an idyllic time for both Will and Ronnie in that summer between high school and college.

In the same style familiar to all Nicholas Sparks fans, he spins another story of love and anger and superlative love and understanding on the part of the father. Ronnie doesnít realize his love until she spends that summer with him and learns the truth about why her parents separated. There are many things Ronnie learns that summer as she goes from being a seventeen-year-old angry teenager to an eighteen-year-old adult who has grown up fast. The characters are typical divorced parents and children. Will and Ronnie show a lot of character and build more. The story has twists and turns that make it seem like a mystery. The end is not all a joyful time. Life does intrude. If youíre a Nicholas Sparks fan, youíll love The Last Song.

The Book

Grand Central Publishing
September 8, 2009
Hardcover
0446547565 / 978-0446547567
General Fiction
More at Amazon.com
Excerpt
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The Reviewer

Jo Rogers
Reviewed 2009
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© 2009 MyShelf.com