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The Serpentís Daughter
Jade del Cameron series #3

by Suzanne Arruda



      Dashing adventuress Jade del Cameron is back for a third adventure, this time in Morocco. She has gone there to meet up with her mother Inez for a few days in Tangiers, before the pair goes to Andalusia, where her mother plans to meet her family and obtain a new horse for the ranch. This sounds pleasant enough, but Jade and Inez do not get on. Jade is wild and headstrong, wanting to be her own woman while her mother wishes she would behave in a more feminine manner and get married. When Inez fails to turn up for tea at their hotel, it becomes apparent that she has been kidnapped - but why?

I confess to being addicted to this series, which draws on some unusual sources for its inspiration, not least the works of Rider Haggard. There is a lot to enjoy in here, not least the setting, for as well as the stunning backdrop of Morocco, with its picturesque towns, there are the Atlas Mountains, home to the mysterious Berbers.

Then there is the rocky relationship between Jade and her mother, setting the stage for the bookís theme of mothers and daughters along with other family ties. Of course there is the plot too, replete with danger and intrigue as Jade has to guess who is behind it all and try and stay a jump ahead. More unusually, this series has its dash of the supernatural, somewhat in the way Rider Haggardís books do but less obtrusively. This is more to the fore in this novel, which has Jade overhearing a conversation from the far past as well as... but I donít want to spoil the story. If you donít care for this type of thing I can assure you that it is not a large part of the story, and all of it can be put down to the imagination if you wish. So maybe there truly is something for everybody in here - one for the keeper shelf, and possibly for my Top Ten books of 2008.

The Book

Obsidian
2 January 2008
Hardback
0451222946 / 9780451222947
Historical Crime, 1920 / Morocco
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Excerpt
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The Reviewer

Rachel A Hyde
Reviewed 2008
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